Car accidents can lead to drowning deaths in Florida

Fatal car accidents happen all the time in Florida. Many traffic deaths are caused by unsafe driving behaviors, weather conditions or mechanical issues. It is important for drivers to be aware of the risks they face when they get behind the wheel, so it may surprise many to learn that Florida has the highest rate of traffic-related drowning deaths in the nation.

Almost 400 people die in drowning-related car accidents every year in the United States. Florida leads the nation with the most traffic accident drowning deaths. The state reports that more than one drowning death is related to a car accident every week.

Drowning and car accidents may not seem related, but statistics show that traffic-related drowning deaths are a serious hazard in Florida. Florida is surrounded by a lot of water. In addition to their coastline, the state also has many lakes and ponds.

Why does Florida have the highest rate of traffic-related drowning deaths? Many roads border water in Florida, which has proven to be very dangerous and deadly for victims of traffic-related drowning accidents. Officials also say that tourists and other drivers not familiar with the roads may be part of the reason why car accident drowning deaths are higher in the state.

When drivers are unfamiliar with the road or if they have a difficult time seeing the road like at night, they may be putting themselves at risk for driving into water. Many car accident drowning cases in Florida have involved tourists driving at night, and they most likely weren’t familiar with the road or even knew they were driving near open water.

Driving in Florida can be dangerous for several reasons. Drivers should be aware of the risks of driving near water, especially if they are unfamiliar with the road. Drivers can also take steps to stay safe behind the wheel like using their brights when driving at night if they are able to and slowing down if they are unfamiliar with the road.

Source:¬†WESH, “Florida leads nation in drowning deaths from traffic accidents,” Bob Kealing, March 4, 2014