The dangers of ‘falling back’ to standard time

To some commuters in Florida, November is the dark time. This essentially means that they will likely be driving to and from work in the dark. With the days only to get shorter before Christmas, the likelihood of pedestrians being involved in accidents increases.  This is because pedestrians are harder to see in the dark than they are in the daytime.

In fact, national statistics on pedestrian safety show that these accidents increase after the change from daylight savings time.

Because of this, drivers and pedestrians must be vigilant in order to avoid being accident statistics. Pedestrians should wear bright or reflective clothing so they can be seen in the dark. Meanwhile, drivers should make certain that their headlights are functioning properly and are not covered with dust or any other debris that would prevent them from illuminating the road ahead.

Drivers across Florida have a duty to use reasonable care when driving. Part of this duty includes driving at speeds safe enough to enable a driver to take proper evasive action to avoid a pedestrian, especially at night. If a driver breaches this duty (either by driving under the influence of alcohol, speeding or texting while driving) he or she could be held liable for the injuries caused through an accident.

This means that an injured pedestrian (or an injured party in another car) may seek compensation for medical expenses, lost income as well as pain and suffering and future rehabilitation costs. If you have questions about your rights after a car-pedestrian accident, contact an attorney.

Source: Turnto23.com, Leaving daylight saving time means more pedestrian accidents, Mark Christian, October 29, 2013